Mindfully African has created the first online directory of qualified mental health specialists based in Africa.

While championing and educating the public on Mental Health issues have recently become mainstream in other parts of the world, ignorance surrounding mental health in Africa persists.
With mental health services low on the agenda for some African governments, Mindfully African was created to fill the gap of available information targeted at African women on mental health.
Read more here.

Editor of Mindfully African, Raimah Amevor, describes the mental health lifestyle brand for African women as a safe space for women of the Continent to learn about and explore their mental health. Mindfully African takes a holistic approach to mental health, which means you will find resources that span across the mind, body and soul, created by African women themselves’.

She adds that ‘When I didn’t know where to go, like most millennials I went online. Finding the black therapists network in the U.K was life-saving and allowed me to find the right therapist to suit my needs’. 
´Having a resource like this is even more important in Africa, where and awareness regarding mental health services are limited’.

Mis-understandings regarding mental health disorders, how they are best treated and what the signs are, are rife in Africa. The silence surrounding Mental Health has created generations of untreated trauma, passed down from one generation to the next. People are often afraid to share struggles they have which often worsens their mental state and in a number of cases leads to suicide. 

Nigerian counsellor and contributor at Mindfully African, Damilola Adedeji says that ‘as the body needs to build immunity against diseases so does the mind. Mindfully African helps provide mental immunity and gives women the right information and tools to strengthen their resilience’.

ABOUT MINDFULLY AFRICAN

Mindfully African (formally known as Therapeutic Lifestyle), aims to increase access to mental health services while destroying the cultural stigma attached to mental health on the African continent. The website provides content specifically targeted to African women, written by qualified counsellors, psychologists and nutritionists. Raimah Amevor created  the website after experiencing depression herself and noticing the increase of reported suicides in Ghana by young women.

 
Find out more information by visiting www.mindfullyafrican.co.uk